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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
courses, but has attracted just 1 student outside of the u-c system. the university began offering 14 on-line courses for college credit a year ago, aiming to generate new revenue by enrolling students worldwide. 17-hundred u-c students have taken the courses, but only one of them is not already enrolled at a u-c campus. governor brown is now looking into the program. >> disgraced cycling champion lance armstrong. has agreed to a rare televised interview with oprah winfrey that will air next week. winfery's web site says, armstrong will address allegations that he used performance- enhancing drugs during his cycling career. this comes days after the new york times reported. that armstrong was telling associates he is considering admitting to doping allegations. which for so long. he so vehemently denied. armstrong was stripped of his 7-tour de france titles. and has been banned from cycling competitions for life >> jacqueline: big changes coming to the forecast spotty showers with cold arctic temperatures will be dropping significantly add look at the morning lows, 20's! frigid temperatu
student has taken a class. the university began offering 14 digital courses one year ago. unlike the uc, stanford and harvard offered online courses for free, uc officials say the fact that their courses allow students to interact, more students should be signing up. >> charging clients who fail to show up for appointments. but what about when you get stuck waiting around for a repair or delivery person who doesn't show up? cbs 5 consumer watch reporter explains your time could be worth some money as well. >> reporter: she's called comcast so many times recently, she even has a name for the hold music. >> the horsy. >> reporter: her internet service went down the day after christmas. she says she couldn't reach a service representative for four days. >> the first thing you hear is they have a high volume of calls. >> reporter: he set up a service apartment to switch out her modem the following monday, but nobody showed up. >> nobody even bothered to call me. >> reporter: an expensive hassle for the single mom who took the morning off work to wait. now comcast has a customer service guar
blame a small group of drivers for the majority of bay area gridlock. researchers from uc-berkeley and mit tracked more than 350,000 drivers through their cell phone and gps signals. when a group came from outlying neighborhoods to travel long distances at the same time, they often clogged up the freeways. caltrans says it may put in more metering lights to spread out the volume in frequently congested areas. >>> coyotes in the bay area's urban centers becoming a bigger problem as the animals and humans come into increasing contact with each other. the twin peaks area in san francisco is reporting an uptick in coyote sightings. one neighbor we spoke to says pets in his neighborhood have started disappearing. wildlife experts say people should bring their pets in at night and secure their outside trash. >>> a beloved primary living at the san francisco zoo for nearly 50 years has died. cbs 5 reporter elissa harrington says zookeepers and visitors said good-bye today to the primate, the matriarch of the chimpanzees. >> reporter: she had be
area and looked around and wondered, where did all these cars come from? now a new study by uc-berkeley and mit answers that. they track about 350,000 bay area drivers using cell phones and gps signals and found most traffic jams are caused by drivers who come from outlying areas but all head in the same direction around the same time clogging up the roads. some of those areas that cause traffic include san ramon, san jose, hayward, dublin and san rafael. caltrans plans to use this information to reduce traffic in the future. one idea, more metering lights. they want to spread out those drivers to keep traffic moving smoothly. another asking drivers in those outlying areas to leave an hour earlier or an hour later. the study shows that by reducing the number of cars on the roads by just 1%, it would save another drive 8 minutes of drive time per hour. again, we're live in san ramon taking a look at interstate 680. traffic is moving now but give it another hour or two it's going to look different. it gets very congested here but with this new
where the trouble spots are. >> reporter: a team of researches, including experts from uc berkeley and caltrans, analyzed three weeks worth of cell phone gps data from over 350,000 people here in the bay area. it's first time a study like this has been attempted. by mapping out where and when those phones were used and comparing that to know traffic patterns, the team determined that a small number of commuters are actually causing some of the regions biggest traffic jams. they found that drivers in parts of san rafael, hayward, san ramon, dublin and san jose are all trying to commute at the same time. thats creating traffic back ups for everyone else. the team believes that by changing the driving habits of the people who live in these areas, overall commute times could be improved. for example, if the number of drivers from these spots was reduced by just 1 percent, the travel times for everyone could be shortened by up to 18 percent. turning a one hour commute, into a 50 minute trip. researchers also say that encouraging people in these areas to carpool or use public transportat
, there are answers. professors at uc berkeley gathered detailed traffic information yet. here is what they found. the traffic is the worst in southeast san jose, hayward, san ramone and san rafael. they looked at issues and they i the have the answer you don't know where traffic comes from. it's like you don't see an accident or anything. it's just bad. >> they believe this happens because people from out lying neighborhoods come together like a river, causing congestion in random times for others on the freeway. this, researchers believe will help them target ask try to somehow fix, the problem areas. >> there are smart people figuring it ut. >> this research will help them use what we have more efficiently. that could mean more metering lice for those feeder neighborhoods. and or advising commuters to leave at different times. >> anything with more lights, please? up next, companies always making the next big thing. >> is it too much for us? >> americans love their gadgets. manufacturers and retailers getting worried about consumer fatigue. i'm david louie. we'll have the story coming up. >> i
at u.c. berkeley, foreign-born, get this wonderful education, microsoft offered you a job for over $100,000 a year, and we have to say if the country will keep you. most of those students are told, they can't stay, get out of the united states. >> get out of the united states. he says for the first time in years both parts of immigration reform can happen. the illegal and the skilled immigration part of it. he also said the skilled part of the equation has, quote, been held hostage to the possible debate over illegal immigration and they haven't been able to fix the high-tech part of it because it's wrapped up in one bruising debate. >> what washington is doing when it comes to the lower immigration jobs it hijacking those higher edution jobs that we need? >> absolutely. >> with the tools that we have -- >> we want to import talent. but we want to grow talent. weapon want engineering and math in the education system. we have to do better with that. and he said better teachers make better students. he's not saying our teachers are bad -- >> our mechanics are bad. >> we need to raise up g
other drivers heading north. researchers from uc berkeley tracked more than 350,000 drivers using cell phone and gps devices and found if 1% of drivers would cancel their trips, traffic would drop by 14%. that means 8 minutes would be saved per hour. traffic ends up congesting quickly once the road's capacity is increased which is why researchers say one small change could make an impact. some drivers are skeptical. >> i don't think there will be a easy fix. i don't think there's a reverse commute anymore because there's people commuting from down here to where i live and then there's people commuting from where i live to down here. it's a hot mess. >> reporter: researchers say the study's findses are significant and could be -- findings are significant and could be helpful. caltrans and others in the industry are studying survey to see if they can install lights at freeway ramps to help space out traffic. you are looking at a live picture of the northbound lanes of 101 where traffic seems to be flowing okay. the southbound lanes are pretty clear. that's the picture out here right now.
that job -- >> do we discourage them now? >> oh, absolutely. you can be a student at uc berkeley, foreign born. get this wonderful education. microsoft offers you a job for over $100,000 a year and we have to say if the country will keep you. and most of those students are told they can't stay. get out of the united states. >> get out of the united states. he wants to change that. and he -- you know, he also is very passionate in his foundation, very passionate about education reform in the united states and measuring results in the u.s. and getting american kids up to snuff on science, technology, engineering, math. he'd like to take the money people pay for the visa to work here, take that money, put it into science and math education in the u.s. so we're growing talent and importing talent at the same time. it's vital to the economy. >> it will be very interesting to see where that goes and if you can do that. there are so many educational systems where math and science is failing or doesn't even exist for students. >> another interesting thing he said, he said that this discussion abo
in effect. some of the prop 30 revenue is earmarked for higher education. but as of now, the uc and csu boards could raise fees. >>> a $12,000 reward is up for a stolen piece of oakland history. the historic gold box was stolen last week. it was taken in the second break-in at the museum in just the last couple of months. the museum has increased its security since then. >>> here's lawrence with your forecast. and we are warming up. >> yes, we are going to need to warm things up nicely into the afternoon as we have cold temperatures outside but high pressure is going to crank up these numbers. beautiful hazy sunshine out over san jose right now. temperatures still cold in spots inland. 20s and 30s there. 40s at the coast. and by the afternoon, 50s even some mid-60s today so some warmer weather is on the way and it's going to hang around. looks like not only today but right through tomorrow and into the weekend. plenty of sunshine coming our way. we're going to check out your "timesaver traffic" coming right up. >>> good morning. checking et ride
in pacif the womb. they tested 40 american and 40 y tim swedish newborns. they counted how many times uc babies sucked on a pacifier as they listened to english and swedish language. americans sucked more often when hearing swedish and vice versa.rns it's con researchers believe that newborns were interested in the foreign sounds. >>> mcdonald's is embracing a new name in australia later this month.nge they'll change the signs on 13 i of its restaurants down under to macus, the australian name for the chain. in in honor of the australian day, the holiday. it will only be temporary po through the end of the month. >> they're changing mcdonald's to -- >> maccas.ma just >>> we all know that accessories are important, right? that even goes for cutting-edge consumer electronics. we'll see the new smartphone accessories and much more at the big show in las vegas right now coming up on "cbs this morning." we'll be right back. >> announcer: this morning's "eye opener" at 8:00 is brought to you by our sponsor, with the inside story on shingles. an intense burning sensation like
assessment of child and teen program at uc san francisco dr. lustig. he's out with an extremely important new book. "fat chance beating the odds against sugar, processed food, obesity and disease." everybody should buy this book and read from it. this is going to be cutting edge in terms of how we look at food and, specifically, let's talk about sugar. which you lay the blame of obesity on sugar. >> actually, i really don't. there are lots and lots of ways to get obese. >> okay. >> lots of different food stuff that contribute to weight gain. for instance, harvard school of public health showed potato chips and french fries were the biggest single contributors to weight gain. >> absolutely. >> the thing about sugar that is so cit is the cause. the thing that takes you from obesity to all the metabolic problems that occur secondary to obesity. that is the hypertension, the diabetes, the heart disease and likely the cancer and the dementia. conglomerately we call this metabolic syndrome. >> got it. okay. that characterizes it well. >> that's where the money goes. >> it does, we can talk about --
're tenured at ucor vine? >> i've been there for 25 years, joe. >> uc ervine? >> it's so hard, joe. you're having a real tough time there digging trenches. >> hey. we're in englewood, new jersey, buddy, so you've got nothing on that. >> been there, done that. i love the mothership. >> laguna is how far from you? >> i can't complain. i'm not complaining. >> you've got a lot of traffic. that's what i'm hanging my hat on. >> there you go. not at this time of morning. >> no. see you later. >> take care, man. >>> coming up, what do hedge funds and advertising agencies have in common? more than you think. how they're invading madison avenue. that and is more when we return. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero hea
ling at it. >> it's t story of america. this is what built thi count, ingenuit >>o ust uce. >> wha can other pple -- wt areth things people can do, justractaltakeaway things. you y saving is impractical. look for job that fits into sobody else's world, but what's something else? >> look at your skill ts, your ucations, passions, interests, and say what problem could i lvith the skskls, passions, andnterests iurrentlye and look to those probl and seef you can start a business or svice companyolving tho it's that simple. it's not complicated. >> if i think i'm failure, i wi be a failure? >> yeah. >> value of posite thinking, it is important. yourindset is important. >> like you fine, steve. >> steve, thank you very, very mu. world renowned dog trainer cesar llan. >> i think that's the doggy you ne to take home. >> real? >> so te. >> right after this. [ y ] eggo! [ le annouer ] eggo waffles are great way to get your family together for breakfast. inact, tmit work too well. [ ding! ] [ shufflin scootg [ clears throat ] [ childr laugh ] [ female annouer golden, crispy oside. warm and fluffy
science professor in raleigh, north carolina. he received his degree from uc san diego. he was part of a team of analysts who correctly predicted the outcome of the popular vote in this year's presidential election between mitt romney and president obama. today, he will give us an over view of the events and values that shaped the 2012 election while giving us an inside look at the challenges, choices, public opinion, researchers face in pre-election polling. please try me in welcoming dr. romney. [applause] -- please join me in welcoming dr. michael dimock. >> thank you. it is always a time to talk about the polling process, the time where we think a lot about what is going on and worry even more than normal about how affect the polls or. we all have our fingers crossed going into election day that our poll will ultimately be closed to the outcome. we were fortunate to get enough again this year to of them well but it's a tricky proposition. i thought i would start by talking by -- about the election. and how it played out over the course of that from our polls in -- and the exit p
, everybody. bay area native and uc berksly graduate chris stevens was one of four killed in that attack on the consulate in libya. this morning hillary clinton meeting face-to-face with the senate foreign relations commit pep at issue, whether the state department ignored stevens' concerns about safety at
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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